tylercrosby:

dplepage:

The integral of z squared dzFrom one to the cube root of threeTimes the cosineOf three pi over nineIs the log of the cube root of e.
\int\limits_{1}^{\sqrt[3]{3}}z^2dz \cdot \cos\left(\frac{3\pi}{9}\right) = \ln\left(\sqrt[3]{e}\right)

Is this actually accurate? I always wondered that.

The integral of z^2dz is z^3/3, so the integral is
int_1^(3^1/3)z^2dz = (3^(1/3)^3 - 1^3)/3 = (3-1)/3 = 2/3
cos(3pi/9) = cos(pi/3) = 1/2
so the left hand side is
2/3*1/2 = 1/3.
ln(e^(1/3)) means “the power you have to raise e to to get e^(1/3)”, which is also 1/3.
So yes! It checks out!

tylercrosby:

dplepage:

The integral of z squared dz
From one to the cube root of three
Times the cosine
Of three pi over nine
Is the log of the cube root of e.

\int\limits_{1}^{\sqrt[3]{3}}z^2dz \cdot \cos\left(\frac{3\pi}{9}\right) = \ln\left(\sqrt[3]{e}\right)

Is this actually accurate? I always wondered that.

The integral of z^2dz is z^3/3, so the integral is

int_1^(3^1/3)z^2dz = (3^(1/3)^3 - 1^3)/3 = (3-1)/3 = 2/3

cos(3pi/9) = cos(pi/3) = 1/2

so the left hand side is

2/3*1/2 = 1/3.

ln(e^(1/3)) means “the power you have to raise e to to get e^(1/3)”, which is also 1/3.

So yes! It checks out!

Tags: math math math

k-b-rock:

sententiola:

Sometimes I think about how many little things we probably do every day that would totally mess up the reasoning of a Sherlock-Holmes-style detective.

Like the other day we went to the cinema and I was wearing a shirt with no pockets so I put the ticket in my trouser pocket.  The next day I was wearing the same trousers and I put my hand in my pocket and found the ticket there.

Now, I have a certain selection of things I always have in my trouser pockets and I don’t really like having anything else in there because it confuses my hands when I want to get something, so I took the ticket out.  And I wasn’t near a rubbish bin, but I was wearing a shirt with a breast pocket.  So I put the ticket in the shirt pocket.

And I thought: if I get interestingly murdered, the Sherlock-Holmes-style detective is going to deduce that I’m wearing the same shirt that I wore yesterday.  Because it’s got a cinema ticket in the pocket with yesterday’s date on, and why on earth would anyone put a cinema ticket in the pocket of a shirt unless they were wearing the shirt when they went to the cinema?

Which is a bit of reasoning we would all find totally convincing if it came from a Sherlock-Holmes-style detective.  But it would be wrong.  Because actually there are so many other explanations for things once you take account of the fact that people are often slightly eccentric in completely trivial and unguessable ways.

“Samuel Vimes dreamed about Clues. He had a jaundiced view of Clues. He instinctively distrusted them. They got in the way. And he distrusted the kind of person who’d take one look at another man and say in a lordly voice to his companion, “Ah, my dear sir, I can tell you nothing except that he is a left-handed stonemason who has spent some years in the merchant navy and has recently fallen on hard times,” and then unroll a lot of supercilious commentary about calluses and stance and the state of a man’s boots, when exactly the same comments could apply to a man who was wearing his old clothes because he’d been doing a spot of home bricklaying for a new barbecue pit, and had been tattooed once when he was drunk and seventeen* and in fact got seasick on a wet pavement. What arrogance! What an insult to the rich and chaotic variety of the human experience!”

—Terry Pratchett, Feet of Clay

(via supergreak)

The integral of z squared dzFrom one to the cube root of threeTimes the cosineOf three pi over nineIs the log of the cube root of e.

\int\limits_{1}^{\sqrt[3]{3}}z^2dz \cdot \cos\left(\frac{3\pi}{9}\right) = \ln\left(\sqrt[3]{e}\right)

The integral of z squared dz
From one to the cube root of three
Times the cosine
Of three pi over nine
Is the log of the cube root of e.

\int\limits_{1}^{\sqrt[3]{3}}z^2dz \cdot \cos\left(\frac{3\pi}{9}\right) = \ln\left(\sqrt[3]{e}\right)

justcarl:

I’m way too impressed by this limerick

justcarl:

I’m way too impressed by this limerick

(via platoapproved)

Tags: math jokes

monalisaparking:

The best part of this DVD

Sarah (Maslany) is in a desperate race to find her missing daughter, but her scorched earth tactics spark a war with Rachel (Maslany), dividing and imperiling all the clones (Maslany, Maslany, Maslany).

monalisaparking:

The best part of this DVD

Sarah (Maslany) is in a desperate race to find her missing daughter, but her scorched earth tactics spark a war with Rachel (Maslany), dividing and imperiling all the clones (Maslany, Maslany, Maslany).

(via theashleyclements)

Tags: Orphan Black

archiemcphee:

These dazzling photos by Mohammad Domiri reveal the awesome interiors of Grand Mosques in northern Iran. Domiri is a physics student and self-taught photographer interested in documenting traditional architectural monuments found throughout the Middle East, mosques in particular.

Domiri described his work in a Daily Mail interview:

"In Iran, we have many historical sites - but some of the greatest are places of worship like mosques. As we have a grand mosque in every big city there are many historical buildings with lots of beautiful mosaics to capture.

I like looking for the symmetry, mosaics and artworks in these temples. I like how they let the light come inside and columns are special too as they divide interior space and give some depth.

Maybe some of these historical sites will not exist in 20 years or change a lot during that time. When I am capturing these pictures, I think about how they will be recorded and in future I hope people will be able to see their beauty.”

These beautiful mosques, ornately decorated with mesmerizing mosaics and geometric patterns, require special permission to be photographed, which makes Domiri’s stunning photos all the more exceptional.

To view even more of these amazing photos visit Mohammad Domiri’s website, 500px page, or his Facebook page.

[via DeMilked and Dailymail.co.uk]

bbcphile:

hardythehermitcrab:

hover text: the nice thing about headcannnons is that it’s really easy to get other people to believe in them (x)

For dplepage

bbcphile:

hardythehermitcrab:

hover text: the nice thing about headcannnons is that it’s really easy to get other people to believe in them (x)

For
dplepage
bbcphile:

mspbandj:

ron-daralki:

sheck-the-wulfy:

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN WEEKS

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN MONTHS! WHY HASN’T IT CROSSED IT IN MONTHS?

IM SITTING IN THE MIDDLE OF MY EMPTY HOUSE LAUGHING LIKE A FUCKING MANIAC AND ITS ECHOING WHAT THE FUCK IS HAPPENING OH MY GOD


For dplepage

bbcphile:

mspbandj:

ron-daralki:

sheck-the-wulfy:

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN WEEKS

THIS HASN’T CROSSED MY DASH IN MONTHS! WHY HASN’T IT CROSSED IT IN MONTHS?

IM SITTING IN THE MIDDLE OF MY EMPTY HOUSE LAUGHING LIKE A FUCKING MANIAC AND ITS ECHOING WHAT THE FUCK IS HAPPENING OH MY GOD

For
dplepage

(Source: allthebestofmemes)

archiemcphee:

Self-taught Alaskan sculptor Lee Cross, known professionally as Wood Splitter Lee, creates incredible one of a kind fantasy creatures that are so remarkably lifelike they verge on creepy, which is just one of the things that makes them so awesome. All of Lee’s creatures are completely made by hand without the use of and patterns, molds or casts. Their bodies contain articulated skeletons wrapped with stuffing, making them very soft to handle and fully posable. They’re decorated with carefully hand-applied synthetic fur and paint. As you can see from these photos, some of Lee’s creatures are more fantastic in nature than others, but they’re all amazing to behold.

Lee’s creatures are available for purchase through weekly Auction Adoptions held on eBay.

To check out more of her phenomenal handmade creatures, visit Wood Splitter Lee’s DeviantArt gallery.

[via DeMilked]

Tags: cats

wildcat2030:

Gigantic ‘Energy Duck’ Could Generate Solar and Hydro Power for Copenhagen
-
The Energy Duck is a submission to the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) 2014, this year held in Copenhagen, Denmark. Designed by the London-based team of Hareth Pochee, Adam Khan, Louis Leger, and Patrick Fryer, the iconic and engaging public artwork proposal is a renewable energy generator and storehouse, an interactive and educative tourist destination, and a celebration of local wildlife. (via Gigantic ‘Energy Duck’ Could Generate Solar and Hydro Power for Copenhagen | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building)

Tags: energy duck

nubbsgalore:

palau’s jellyfish lake was once connected to the pacific ocean, but when the sea level dropped its population of jellyfish were left to thrive in the isolation of its algae rich waters. no longer needing to defend themselves from predators, the jellyfish lost their sting, allowing snorkelers to now swim with them as they make their daily 800 metre migration from one end of the lake to the other.

photos by (click pic) david kirkland, david doubilet, tomas kotoucjody macdonaldchean chong lim, eric changnadia aly and richard schneider  (see also: vancouver aquarium jellyfish)

(via we-are-star-stuff)

710642:

well? can he????

710642:

well? can he????

(via platoapproved)

applebottomclaudiajeans:

capekalaska:

killdeercheer:

sizvideos:

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Ruins Your Zombie Fantasies Forever - Video

Love this bit

"just sayin’"

He’s thought about it though. One of the greatest minds of our generation sat down one day and was like “wait, could zombies exist?” And then he did the science thing and was like “nah we’re good.”

(via caparazona)


"Feynman recounted another good one upperclassmen would use on freshmen physics students: When you look at words in a mirror, how come they’re reversed left to right but not top to bottom? What’s special about the horizontal axis?"

Source: http://xkcd.com/1145/

"Feynman recounted another good one upperclassmen would use on freshmen physics students: When you look at words in a mirror, how come they’re reversed left to right but not top to bottom? What’s special about the horizontal axis?"

Source: http://xkcd.com/1145/

(Source: gnatarie)